Related topics: sensors

Scientists research effects of infrasonic vibrations in humans

It is known that the human body can generate mechanical vibrations at very low frequencies, so-called infrasonic waves. Such low-frequency vibrations are produced by physiological processes—heartbeats, respiratory movements, ...

Taking the momentum out of vibrations

Diesel engines vibrate. This produces tremendous stress on the components of ships. Adaptronic systems effectively reduce these vibrations. At the maritime trade fair SMM, Fraunhofer researchers are presenting a simulation ...

Building a Moebius strip of good vibrations

Yale physicists have created something similar to a Moebius strip of moving energy between two vibrating objects, opening the door to novel forms of control over waves in acoustics, laser optics, and quantum mechanics.

New model for controlling hot molecule reactions

Hot molecules, which are found in extreme environments such as the edges of fusion reactors, are much more reactive than those used to understand reaction studies at ambient temperature. Detailed knowledge of their reactions ...

Vibrations make large landslides flow like fluid

A new study may finally explain why some landslides travel much greater distances than scientists would normally expect. A team of researchers used a sophisticated computer model to show that vibrations generated by large ...

Atomic vibrations in nanomaterials

All materials are made up of atoms, which vibrate. These vibrations, or 'phonons', are responsible, for example, for how electric charge and heat is transported in materials. Vibrations of metals, semiconductors, and insulators ...

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