Molecular tweezers that attack antibiotic resistant bacteria

Researchers from Ben-Gurion University (BGU), together with American and German colleagues, have developed new "molecular tweezers" to combat antibiotic-resistant bacteria. Their recently announced findings were published ...

Plasmonic tweezers: For nanoscale optical trapping and beyond

Optical tweezers and associated manipulation tools in the far field have had a major impact on scientific and engineering research by offering precise manipulation of small objects. More recently, near-field manipulation ...

Advance in 'optical tweezers' to boost biomedical research

Much like the Jedis in Star Wars use the Force to control objects from a distance, scientists can use light or optical force to move very small particles. The inventors of this ground-breaking laser technology, known as "optical ...

Nanospheres measure the forces of cell motors

Motor proteins generate the forces for essential mechanical processes in our body. On a scale of nanometers—a millionth of a millimeter—motor proteins, for example, power our muscles or transport material within our cells. ...

Team's bigger and better 'tweezer clock' is super stable

JILA physicists have boosted the signal power of their atomic "tweezer clock" and measured its performance in part for the first time, demonstrating high stability close to the best of the latest generation of atomic clocks.

Trapping nanoparticles with optical tweezers

By exploiting a particular property of light diffraction at the interface between a glass and a liquid, researchers have demonstrated the first optical tweezers capable of trapping nanoscale particles.

A photonic curveball has real-world examples in soccer, baseball

Have you ever been amazed by a curveball goal scored by Diego Maradona, Lionel Messi or Christiano Ronaldo? Then you have—possibly without knowing it—been exposed to the Magnus effect: the fact that spinning objects tend ...

Sound waves replace human hands in petri dish experiments

Mechanical engineers at Duke University have demonstrated a set of prototypes for manipulating particles and cells in a Petri dish using sound waves. The devices, known in the scientific community as "acoustic tweezers," ...

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