Related topics: eggs · sea turtles

New threat revealed for baby turtles

New research has revealed that marine turtle hatchlings entering the ocean close to jetties have a high likelihood of being eaten.

Mexico's prized beaches threatened by smelly algae invasion

Tourists looking for sun and sand in Mexican resorts like Cancun, Playa del Carmen and Tulum have been disgusted by foul-smelling mounds of sargassum—a seaweed-like algae—piling up on beaches and turning turquoise waters ...

Defining Hurricane Michael's impact on St. Joe Bay, Florida

Hurricane Michael tore a path through Panama City, Mexico Beach, and Port St. Joe, Florida in October 2018. The storm devastated the area and created a new pass along the St. Joseph Peninsula, just north of the entrance to ...

Heatwave devastates wildlife populations in World Heritage Site

Large numbers of dugongs, sea snakes and other marine animals disappeared from the UNESCO World Heritage Site Shark Bay, Western Australia, after a heat wave devastated seagrass meadows, according to recently released research.

Crawling to extinction: Singapore turtle haven fights for life

Hundreds of turtles and tortoises, including rare and endangered species, face an uncertain future after their Singapore sanctuary—a Guinness World Record holder—was forced to relocate due to government redevelopment ...

page 1 from 23

Turtle

Cryptodira Pleurodira and see text

Turtles are reptiles of the order Testudines (the crown group of the superorder Chelonia), characterised by a special bony or cartilaginous shell developed from their ribs that acts as a shield. "Turtle" may either refer to the Testudines as a whole, or to particular Testudines which make up a form taxon that is not monophyletic—see also sea turtle, terrapin, tortoise, and the discussion below.

The order Testudines includes both extant (living) and extinct species. The earliest known turtles date from 215 million years ago, making turtles one of the oldest reptile groups and a more ancient group than lizards and snakes. About 300 species are alive today, and some are highly endangered.

Like other reptiles, turtles are ectotherms—varying their internal temperature according to the ambient environment, commonly called cold-blooded. Like other amniotes (reptiles, dinosaurs, birds, and mammals), they breathe air and do not lay eggs underwater, although many species live in or around water. The largest turtles are aquatic.

This text uses material from Wikipedia, licensed under CC BY-SA