Related topics: eggs · sea turtles

Sharks use Earth's magnetic fields to guide them like a map

Sea turtles are known for relying on magnetic signatures to find their way across thousands of miles to the very beaches where they hatched. Now, researchers reporting in the journal Current Biology on May 6 have some of ...

New species of pelomedusoid turtle found in Madagascar

A team of researchers from Universität Freiburg, the Denver Museum of Nature & Science, Université d'Antananarivo and Stony Brook University has discovered a new species of pelomedusoid turtle in Madagascar. In their paper ...

Steep decline in giant sea turtles seen off US West Coast

Scientists were documenting stranded sea turtles on California's beaches nearly 40 years ago when they noticed that leatherbacks—massive sea turtles that date to the time of the dinosaurs—were among those washing up on ...

Seagrasses turn back the clock on ocean acidification

Spanning six years and seven seagrass meadows along the California coast, a paper published today from the University of California, Davis, is the most extensive study yet of how seagrasses can buffer ocean acidification.

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Turtle

Cryptodira Pleurodira and see text

Turtles are reptiles of the order Testudines (the crown group of the superorder Chelonia), characterised by a special bony or cartilaginous shell developed from their ribs that acts as a shield. "Turtle" may either refer to the Testudines as a whole, or to particular Testudines which make up a form taxon that is not monophyletic—see also sea turtle, terrapin, tortoise, and the discussion below.

The order Testudines includes both extant (living) and extinct species. The earliest known turtles date from 215 million years ago, making turtles one of the oldest reptile groups and a more ancient group than lizards and snakes. About 300 species are alive today, and some are highly endangered.

Like other reptiles, turtles are ectotherms—varying their internal temperature according to the ambient environment, commonly called cold-blooded. Like other amniotes (reptiles, dinosaurs, birds, and mammals), they breathe air and do not lay eggs underwater, although many species live in or around water. The largest turtles are aquatic.

This text uses material from Wikipedia, licensed under CC BY-SA