High-gravity water waves

What might look like jelly being stirred is actually water subjected to 20 times normal Earth gravity within ESA's Large Diameter Centrifuge—as part of an experiment giving new insight into the behavior of wave turbulence.

No storm in a teacup: It's a cyclone on a silicon chip

University of Queensland researchers have combined quantum liquids and silicon-chip technology to study turbulence for the first time, opening the door to new navigation technologies and improved understanding of the turbulent ...

Research reveals a singular moment: When a bubble breaks free

Understanding how a drop or bubble suspended in a larger mass of fluid divides into multiple pieces is invaluable for engineers designing chemical reactors, engines and ships, as well as for geoscientists studying interactions ...

Turbulence meets a shock

This may come as a shock, if you're moving fast enough. The shock being shock waves. A balloon's 'pop' is shock waves generated by exploded bits of the balloon moving faster than the speed of sound. Supersonic planes generate ...

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