Edible antibodies to treat and prevent gastrointestinal disorders

Therapeutic antibodies are increasingly being used in the clinic for the treatment of diseases. Yet, oral to gut targeting of antibodies remains a challenge due to their inability to survive digestion and reach gastrointestinal ...

From mirror-image biology to enhanced therapeutic proteins

Scientists from the German Cancer Research Center (DKFZ) have succeeded in reconstructing biomolecules in their mirror-image form. The researchers' goal is to create a mirror-image artificial protein synthesis system. Their ...

Therapeutic antibodies vary depending on production system

Differences in production methods for therapeutic antibodies can lead to variations in their structure, depending on the recombinant procedure selected. The distinctions, which are based on a number of glycosylations, even ...

How to spark a chemical chain reaction

Tailor-made protein drugs in the fight against cancer and other diseases are a step close, with the Centre for NanoScale Science and Technology at Flinders playing a part in one of the latest chemistry discoveries in effectively ...

DNA computer brings 'intelligent drugs' a step closer

Researchers at Eindhoven University of Technology (TU/e) present a new method for controlled drug delivery into the bloodstream using DNA computers. In the journal Nature Communications, the team, led by biomedical engineer ...

Antibody-making bacteria promise drug development

Monoclonal antibodies, proteins that bind to and destroy foreign invaders in our bodies, routinely are used as therapeutic agents to fight a wide range of maladies including breast cancer, leukemia, asthma, arthritis, psoriasis, ...

New tool identifies therapeutic proteins in a 'snap'

(Phys.org) β€”In human and bacterial cells, glycosylation – the chemical process of attaching complex sugar molecules to proteins – is as fundamental as it gets, affecting every biological mechanism from cell signaling ...

DNA nanorobots find and tag cellular targets

Researchers at Columbia University Medical Center, working with their collaborators at the Hospital for Special Surgery, have created a fleet of molecular "robots" that can home in on specific human cells and mark them for ...

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