Reducing global warming matters for freshwater fish species

The habitats of freshwater fish species are threatened by global warming, mainly due to rising water temperatures. A 3.2-degree Celsius increase in global mean temperature would threaten more than half of the habitat for ...

In symbiosis: Plants control the genetics of microbes

Researchers from the University of Ottawa have discovered that plants may be able to control the genetics of their intimate root symbionts—the organism with which they live in symbiosis—thereby providing a better understanding ...

Why plants in wetlands are highly productive

Environmental scientists of Leiden University have found that the so-called leaf economics spectrum for plants can not only be applied to terrestrial ecosystems, such as forests and grasslands, but also to wetlands. Furthermore, ...

Algal genome provides insights into first land plants

Cornell researchers have sequenced and analyzed the genome of a single-celled alga that belongs to the closest lineage to terrestrial plants and provides many clues to how aquatic plants first colonized land.

How plants are working hard for the planet

As the planet warms, plants are working to slow the effect of human-caused climate change—and research published today in Trends in Plant Science has assessed how plants are responding to increasing carbon dioxide (CO2).

Expansion of agricultural land reduces CO2 absorption

Plants absorb some of the carbon dioxide (CO2) released into the atmosphere by burning fossil fuels. But increasing deforestation and other changes in land use will reduce the CO2 absorption capacity of these areas in the ...

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