Related topics: nanoparticles

Researchers measure puncture performance of viper fangs

A team that studies how biological structures such as cactus spines and mantis shrimp appendages puncture living tissue has turned its attention to viper fangs. Specifically, the scientists wanted to know, what physical characteristics ...

Nature-inspired antibacterial metals

From aviation to medicine, various sectors are increasingly using materials that mimic the lotus plant, whose leaves have self-cleaning properties. Thanks to the bumpy surface structure covered with tube-shaped wax crystals, ...

X-ray analysis of carbon nanostructures helps material design

Nanostructures made of carbon are extremely versatile. They can absorb ions in batteries and supercapacitors, store gases and desalinate water. How well they cope with the task at hand depends largely on the structural features ...

Five maps that reveal the world's remaining wilderness

There aren't many corners of the world left untouched by humanity. Recent research has highlighted that just 23% of the planet's land surface (excluding Antarctica) and 13% of the ocean can now be classified as wilderness, ...

page 1 from 23

Surface area

Surface area is the measure of how much exposed area a solid object has, expressed in square units. Mathematical description of the surface area is considerably more involved then the definition of arc length of a curve. For polyhedra (objects with flat polygonal faces) the surface area is the sum of the areas of its faces. Smooth surfaces, such as a sphere, are assigned surface area using their representation as parametric surfaces. This definition of the surface area is based on methods of infinitesimal calculus and involves partial derivatives and double integration.

General definition of surface area was sought by Henri Lebesgue and Hermann Minkowski at the turn of the twentieth century. Their work led to the development of geometric measure theory which studies various notions of surface area for irregular objects of any dimension. An important example is the Minkowski content of a surface.

This text uses material from Wikipedia, licensed under CC BY-SA