Related topics: cancer cells

How your clothes influence the air you breathe

Dusan Licina, a tenure-track assistant professor at the Smart Living Lab, EPFL Fribourg, has taken a critical look at how much we really know about our exposure to particles and chemicals transported by our clothing. His ...

Homemade cat food diets could be risky

One quick Google search can net hundreds of homemade cat food recipes, but a new study from researchers at the University of California, Davis, finds most are unlikely to provide cats all their essential nutrients. Some recipes ...

Slime mold absorbs substances to memorize them

In 2016, CNRS scientists demonstrated that the slime mold Physarum polycephalum, a single-cell organism without a nervous system, could learn to no longer fear a harmless but aversive substance and could transmit this knowledge ...

Cathinone color test is now on the market

Every four days, a new illicit synthetic drug enters the world market. These drugs, which are designed to mimic established drugs of abuse, are cheap, often highly toxic, and difficult—if not impossible—to detect using ...

Tracing water contaminants back to the source

Insidious PFAS contaminants are travelling long distances via our waterways but their unique 'signature' can give researchers clues about where they come from so they can be cleaned up.

Solving a hairy forensic problem

For decades, forensic scientists have tested strands of hair to reveal drug use or poisoning. But in recent years, reports have questioned the technique—in particular, its ability to distinguish between the intake of a ...

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