Superconduction—why does it have to be so cold?

Currently, there is no precise computation method to describe superconducting materials. TU Wien has now made a major advance towards achieving this goal and, at the same time, has furthered an understanding of why conventional ...

Superconductors: Resistance is futile

Every standard cable, every wire, every electronic device has some electric resistance. There are, however, superconducting materials with the ability to conduct electrical current with a resistance of exactly zero – at ...

Interdisciplinary interactions inspire new discovery

Following an interdisciplinary approach, researchers in Japan have found new catalysts using unique Heusler alloys. Most studies on catalysts have been conducted by researchers in chemistry. However, catalysts also relate ...

Using electricity to switch magnetism

At TU Wien, researchers have taken a major step toward linking electrical and magnetic material properties, which is crucial for possible applications in electronics.

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Solid-state physics

Solid-state physics, the largest branch of condensed matter physics, is the study of rigid matter, or solids, through methods such as quantum mechanics, crystallography, electromagnetism and metallurgy. Solid-state physics considers how the large-scale properties of solid materials result from their atomic-scale properties. Solid-state physics thus forms the theoretical basis of materials science, as well as having direct applications, for example in the technology of transistors and semiconductors.

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