Researchers report an insulator made of two conductors

Ohm's law is well-known from physics class. It states that the resistance of a conductor and the voltage applied to it determine how much current will flow through the conductor. The electrons in the material—the negatively ...

New technique illuminates DNA helix

Cornell researchers have identified a new way to measure DNA torsional stiffness—how much resistance the helix offers when twisted—information that can potentially shed light on how cells work.

Fluorescent nanodiamonds successfully injected into living cells

As odd as it sounds, many scientists have attempted to place extremely small diamonds inside living cells. Why? Because nanodiamonds are consistently bright and can give us unique knowledge about the inner life of cells over ...

Electrons living on the edge

Scientists at the University of Tsukuba demonstrated the possibility of electrons moving as if they were massless when certain materials called "topological insulators" are irradiated with laser beams. This work may lead ...

How to untie magnetic nano-knots

Skyrmions—tiny magnetic whirls that appear in certain combinations of materials—are considered promising information carriers for future data storage. A research team from RWTH Aachen University, Kiel University, and ...

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Solid-state physics

Solid-state physics, the largest branch of condensed matter physics, is the study of rigid matter, or solids, through methods such as quantum mechanics, crystallography, electromagnetism and metallurgy. Solid-state physics considers how the large-scale properties of solid materials result from their atomic-scale properties. Solid-state physics thus forms the theoretical basis of materials science, as well as having direct applications, for example in the technology of transistors and semiconductors.

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