Related topics: plants · climate change · nitrogen · atmosphere · carbon

New database reveals plants' secret relationships with fungi

Leiden researchers have compiled information collected by scientists over the past 120 years into a database of plant-fungal interactions. This important biological data is now freely available for researchers and nature ...

How does an increase in nitrogen application affect grasslands?

The "PaNDiv" experiment, established by researchers of the University of Bern on a 3000 m2 field site, is the largest biodiversity-ecosystem functioning experiment in Switzerland and aims to better understand how increases ...

Czech Republic drought visible from space

The prolonged period of dry weather in the Czech Republic has resulted in what experts are calling the 'worst drought in 500 years.' Scientists are using ESA satellite data to monitor the drought that's gripped the country.

What limits the ability of plants to draw water from dry soil?

What limits the ability of plants to draw water from dry soil? That's the question California State University, Fullerton plant biologist H. Jochen Schenk and his collaborators addressed in a study supported by the National ...

Soybean seeding rates and risk

To some, farming might seem simple: plant seeds, help them grow, then sell the product. But the reality is much different. Farming requires many complex decisions throughout the year.

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Soil

Soil is a natural body consisting of layers (soil horizons) of mineral constituents of variable thicknesses, which differ from the parent materials in their morphological, physical, chemical, and mineralogical characteristics. It is composed of particles of broken rock that have been altered by chemical and environmental processes that include weathering and erosion. Soil differs from its parent rock due to interactions between the lithosphere, hydrosphere, atmosphere, and the biosphere. It is a mixture of mineral and organic constituents that are in solid, gaseous and aqueous states. Soil particles pack loosely, forming a soil structure filled with pore spaces. These pores contain sol solution (liquid) and air (gas). Accordingly, soils are often treated as a three state system. Most soils have a density between 1 and 2 g/cm³. Soil is also known as earth: it is the substance from which our planet takes its name. Little of the soil composition of planet Earth is older than Tertiary and most no older than Pleistocene. In engineering, soil is referred to as regolith, or loose rock material.

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