An unusual molecule protects nerve cells from degeneration

An international research team led by Professor Stephanie Grond from the Institute of Organic Chemistry at the University of Tübingen has found that the natural substance collinolactone reduces artificially-induced stress ...

Clover growth in Mars-like soils boosted by bacterial symbiosis

Clover plants grown in Mars-like soils experience significantly more growth when inoculated with symbiotic nitrogen-fixing bacteria than when left uninoculated. Franklin Harris of Colorado State University, U.S., and colleagues ...

Bacteria stunt with established plant-soil feedback theory

"What I find most alluring about soil life is that you can steer it," researcher Martijn Bezemer of the Institute Biology Leiden (IBL) reveals. "You can ask: What do you want? And then I can transform the soil into something ...

Hidden bacterial hairs power nature's 'electric grid'

A hair-like protein hidden inside bacteria serves as a sort of on-off switch for nature's "electric grid," a global web of bacteria-generated nanowires that permeates all oxygen-less soil and deep ocean beds, Yale researchers ...

Bacteria used to clean diesel-polluted soil in Greenland

Diesel-polluted soil from now-defunct military outposts in Greenland can be remediated using naturally occurring soil bacteria, according to an extensive five-year experiment in Mestersvig, East Greenland, to which the University ...

Earthworms could help reduce antibiotic resistance genes in soil

Earthworms improve the soil by aerating it, breaking down organic matter and mineralizing nutrients. Now, researchers reporting in ACS' Environmental Science & Technology have dug up another possible role: reducing the number ...

Soil bacteria evolve with climate change

While evolution is normally thought of as occurring over millions of years, researchers at the University of California, Irvine have discovered that bacteria can evolve in response to climate change in 18 months. In a study ...

In wild soil, predatory bacteria grow faster than their prey

Predatory bacteria—bacteria that eat other bacteria—grow faster and consume more resources than non-predators in the same soil, according to a new study out this week from Northern Arizona University. These active predators, ...

Fungi could manipulate bacteria to enrich soil with nutrients

A team of researchers from the Boyce Thompson Institute (BTI) has discovered a distinct group of bacteria that may help fungi and plants acquire soil nutrients. The findings could point the way to cost-effective and eco-friendly ...

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