Related topics: graphene

Carbon-rich exoplanets may be made of diamonds

As missions like NASA's Hubble Space Telescope, TESS and Kepler continue to provide insights into the properties of exoplanets (planets around other stars), scientists are increasingly able to piece together what these planets ...

The Euclid space telescope is coming together

ESA's Euclid mission has reached another milestone on its journey towards launch. Its two instruments are now built and fully tested. These have been delivered to Airbus Defence and Space in Toulouse, France, where they are ...

Renewable fuel from carbon dioxide with the aid of solar energy

Researchers at Linköping University, Sweden, are attempting to convert carbon dioxide, a greenhouse gas, to fuel using energy from sunlight. Recent results have shown that it is possible to use their technique to selectively ...

A touch of gold and silver

Metals are usually characterized by good electrical conductivity. This applies in particular to gold and silver. However, researchers from the Max Planck Institute for Solid State Research in Stuttgart, together with partners ...

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Silicon carbide

Silicon carbide (SiC), also known as carborundum, is a compound of silicon and carbon with a chemical formula SiC. It occurs in nature as the extremely rare mineral moissanite. Silicon carbide powder has been mass-produced since 1893 for use as an abrasive. Grains of silicon carbide can be bonded together by sintering to form very hard ceramics which are widely used in applications requiring high endurance, such as car brakes and ceramic plates in bulletproof vests. Electronic applications of silicon carbide as light emitting diode and detector in early radios have been demonstrated around 1907, and nowadays SiC is widely used in high-temperature semiconductor electronics. Large single crystals of silicon carbide can be grown by the Lely method; they can be cut into gems known as "synthetic moissanite". Silicon carbide with high surface area can be produced from SiO2 contained in plant material.

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