Related topics: graphene

Saving energy by taking a close look inside transistors

Researchers at Friedrich-Alexander-Universität Erlangen-Nürnberg (FAU) have developed a simple yet accurate method for finding defects in the latest generation of silicon carbide transistors. This will speed up the process ...

Aluminum nitride to extend life of solar power plants

NUST MISIS scientists together with their colleagues from the Central Metallurgical R&D Institute (Cairo, Egypt) have developed a composite material to extend the life of solar towers up to five years. The research article ...

Scientists shed light on semiconductor degradation mechanism

Scientists at Nagoya Institute of Technology (NITech) and collaborating universities in Japan have gained new insight into the mechanisms behind degradation of a semiconductor material that is used in electronic devices. ...

Graphene takes a step toward renewable fuel

Using the energy from the sun and graphene applied to the surface of cubic silicon carbide, researchers at Linköping University, Sweden, are working to develop a method to convert water and carbon dioxide to the renewable ...

Atoms use tunnels to escape graphene cover

Graphene has held great potential for practical applications since it was first isolated in 2004. But we still don't use it in our large-scale technology, because we have no way of producing graphene on an industrial scale. ...

Tiny diamond invention could help launch rockets into space

Scientists at ANU have invented tiny diamond electronic parts that could outperform and be more durable than today's devices in high-radiation environments such as rocket engines, helping to reach the next frontier in space.

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Silicon carbide

Silicon carbide (SiC), also known as carborundum, is a compound of silicon and carbon with a chemical formula SiC. It occurs in nature as the extremely rare mineral moissanite. Silicon carbide powder has been mass-produced since 1893 for use as an abrasive. Grains of silicon carbide can be bonded together by sintering to form very hard ceramics which are widely used in applications requiring high endurance, such as car brakes and ceramic plates in bulletproof vests. Electronic applications of silicon carbide as light emitting diode and detector in early radios have been demonstrated around 1907, and nowadays SiC is widely used in high-temperature semiconductor electronics. Large single crystals of silicon carbide can be grown by the Lely method; they can be cut into gems known as "synthetic moissanite". Silicon carbide with high surface area can be produced from SiO2 contained in plant material.

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