Image: Space antenna

Unlike traditional satellite dishes used to pick up television signals, this antenna has to work in space itself. Rather than being clamped to an apartment balcony, it will be installed on the exterior of Europe's Columbus ...

What happened after the lights came on in the universe?

An experiment to explore the aftermath of cosmic dawn, when stars and galaxies first lit up the universe, has received nearly $10 million in funding from the National Science Foundation to expand its detector array in South ...

OSIRIS-REx says hello to the Allen Telescope Array

The Allen Telescope Array uses 42 radio dishes to search for radio transmissions from ET. How do we know the system is working? To answer that we point the dishes in the direction of a spacecraft we know is transmitting radio ...

Catching signals from a speeding satellite

Soaring high above Earth as they speed through space, satellites are difficult targets to track. Now a new approach developed in Europe is helping ground stations to acquire signals faster and more accurately than ever before.

Inflatable antennae could give CubeSats greater reach

The future of satellite technology is getting small—about the size of a shoebox, to be exact. These so-called "CubeSats," and other small satellites, are making space exploration cheaper and more accessible: The minuscule ...

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