Eavesdropping on the particular chatter on the sub-atomic world

Much like two friendly neighbors getting together to chat over a cup of coffee, the minuscule particles in our sub-atomic world also come together to engage in a kind of conversation. Now, nuclear scientists are developing ...

How did the proton get its spin?

Calculating a proton's spin used to be an easy college assignment. In fact, Carl Gagliardi remembers answering that question when he was a physics graduate student in the 1970s. But the real answer turned out not to be simple ...

New portal to unveil the dark sector of the Universe

Once upon a time, the Universe was just a hot soup of particles. In those days, together with visible particles, other particles to us hidden or dark might have formed. Billions of years later scientists catalogued 17 types ...

A quark like no other: Searching for 'bottom quark'

A University of Iowa physicist is at the forefront of the search for a missing particle that could prove whether the Higgs boson—believed to give mass to all matter—exists.

Using fast particles to probe hot matter in nuclear collisions

The hottest matter that existed in the early universe after the Big Bang is created in collisions of high-energy nuclei. Using information on the propagation and attenuation of fast particles coming from the collisions, nuclear ...

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