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Tweeting while watching TV diminishes enjoyment

Toggling between viewing entertainment and social media lessens a person's ability to escape reality and enjoy a show, according to a new University of Connecticut study.

Santorini volcano, a new terrestrial analogue of Mars

The Greek island of Santorini is now one of the most popular tourist destinations in the Mediterranean, but 3,600 years ago it suffered one of the largest volcanic eruptions in recorded history. Among the material that was ...

New York probing Facebook on data from apps: source

New York regulators are probing Facebook's gathering of intimate consumer data such as menstrual cycles and body weight through smartphone applications, a person familiar with the matter said Thursday.

Female presidents are held to higher standards than males

Kirsten Gillibrand, Tulsi Gabbard, Kamala Harris, Elizabeth Warren, Amy Klobuchar—the list of women who have thrown their hats into the ring for the 2020 U.S. presidential election continues to grow.

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Popularity

Popularity is the quality of being well-liked or common, or having a high social status. Popularity figures are an important part of many people's personal value systems and form a vital component of success in people-oriented fields such as management, politics, and entertainment, among others.[citation needed]

Borrowed from the Latin popularis in 1490, originally meant common or "being well-liked". The use of the word popular to mean the "fact or condition of being well liked by the people" is seen originally in 1601.

Many different variations of popularity exist, and many ways in which to gain it. General popularity usually involves respect in two directions: a popular person is respected by peers and will reciprocate that respect, thus reinforcing the belief of deserving the popularity. Likewise, amicability is an important component of popularity, as a person who does not like others is unlikely to be liked by others. This reciprocal nature of interpersonal popularity is often overlooked by people (particularly the young) who are attempting to become popular: being loud may be successful in gaining attention, but is unlikely to provide mutual respect.

Neuroimaging identifies the anterior insula and anterior cingulate as key areas in the brain determining whether people prefer something in regard to its being popular with their peer group. The influence of one's peer group upon them is strongest during adolescence.

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