NASA Lucy mission's message to the future

In the 1970s four spacecraft began their one-way trips out of our Solar System. As the first human-built objects to ever venture into interstellar space, NASA chose to place plaques on Pioneer 10 and 11 and golden records ...

Ancient oral biome points to overall health

When a baby puts something from the floor in their mouth, we panic, but the mouth already contains thousands of bacteria. Now a team of researchers is looking at archaeological remains for an example of how Japanese oral ...

New imaging technology could help predict heart attacks

Researchers have developed a new intravascular imaging technique that could one day be used to detect coronary plaques that are likely to lead to a heart attack. Heart attacks are often triggered when an unstable plaque ruptures ...

Extracting information from ancient teeth

There's a surprising amount of information stored in the hardened plaque, or calculus, between teeth. And if that calculus belongs to the remains of a person who lived in ancient times, the information could reveal new insights ...

How damaging proteins form

Alzheimer's disease and Parkinson's disease are both examples of amyloid diseases, where malfunctioning proteins accumulate to form fibrils and larger aggregates called amyloid plaques. In the journal Biophysical Chemistry ...

Decreased iron levels in seawater make mussels loosen their grip

Mussels secrete sticky plaques that help them attach to wet surfaces, such as rocks on the beach. These adhesive structures are rich in iron, which is thought to help make the attachments strong yet flexible. Now, researchers ...

New nanoparticle drug combination for atherosclerosis developed

Physicochemical cargo-switching nanoparticles (CSNP) designed by KAIST can help significantly reduce cholesterol and macrophage foam cells in arteries, which are the two main triggers for atherosclerotic plaque and inflammation.

Thwarting deadly heart blockages with organic nanoparticles

Cardiovascular disease, which kills one Australian every 12 minutes, is caused by a hardening of the arteries due to abnormal deposits of fat and cholesterol (known as plaque) in the inner lining of the artery; a process ...

Bacteria form biofilms like settlers form cities

Microbiologists have long adopted the language of human settlement to describe how bacteria live and grow: They "invade" and "colonize." Relations dwelling in close proximity are "colonies."

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