Related topics: supercomputer

IBM To Build Supercomputer For U.S. Government

(PhysOrg.com) -- The U.S. Government has contracted out IBM to build a massive supercomputer bigger than any supercomputer out there. The supercomputer system, called Sequoia, will be capable of delivering 20 petaflops (1,000 ...

China supercomputer world's fastest: report

A Chinese supercomputer is the fastest in the world, according to survey results announced Monday, comfortably overtaking a US machine which now ranks second.

Mira the supercomputer

Argonne's new supercomputer won't be in full production until 2013, but it represents such a leap forward that just the first two prototype racks already rank among the top 100 fastest computers in the world.

HPC means business in Cray XC30-A supercomputer debut

(Phys.org) —What better place to use the "new vintage" computing theme than in Napa Valley where the Cray User Group meeting took place on Tuesday, The tie-in this year is Cray's new vintage of supercomputers for a business ...

Sequoia supercomputer transitions to classified work

The National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA) today announced that its Sequoia supercomputer at Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL) has completed its transition to classified computing in support of the Stockpile ...

Cray supercomputer named world's fastest

A Cray supercomputer at the US government's Oak Ridge National Laboratory was named Monday the world's fastest, overtaking an IBM supercomputer at another American research center.

page 1 from 3

FLOPS

In computing, FLOPS (or flops or flop/s, for floating-point operations per second) is a measure of a computer's performance, especially in fields of scientific calculations that make heavy use of floating-point calculations, similar to the older, simpler, instructions per second. Since the final S stands for "second", conservative speakers consider "FLOPS" as both the singular and plural of the term, although the singular "FLOP" is frequently encountered. Alternatively, the singular FLOP (or flop) is used as an abbreviation for "FLoating-point OPeration", and a flop count is a count of these operations (e.g., required by a given algorithm or computer program). In this context, "flops" is simply the plural rather than a rate.

Although it is in common use, FLOPS is not an SI unit. The expression 1 flops is actually interpreted as .

This text uses material from Wikipedia, licensed under CC BY-SA