Twisted-wing parasites feel no pain

Reproduction in the insect order Strepsiptera—also known as twisted-wing parasites—is not for the fainthearted. To inseminate the eggs of its partner, the male partner injures the "neck" of the female with its hook-shaped ...

Exploring wildlife's 'worm-wide web'

Many of us try to repress the thought of them, while others have come to accept them. Whatever your take on parasites is, they can tell scientists a lot about ecology, health and the environment.

Prehistoric faeces reveal parasites from feasting at Stonehenge

A new analysis of ancient faeces found at the site of a prehistoric village near Stonehenge has uncovered evidence of the eggs of parasitic worms, suggesting the inhabitants feasted on the internal organs of cattle and fed ...

Scientists crack egg forging evolutionary puzzle

As many humans prepare to unwrap their Easter eggs, scientists have solved one of nature's biggest criminal cases, an egg forgery scandal two million years in the making. Their findings suggest that the victims of this fraud ...

Native parasite thrives alongside its bee host

Like disease in humans, parasites can wage a deadly evolutionary "arms race" against their hosts, even driving small populations to extinction if they mutate more quickly and gain the upper hand.

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