Related topics: ocean

New projection: Faster rising seas forecast in South Florida

New scientific projections released Wednesday predict that ocean levels will rise even faster than previously forecast over the next four decades in low-lying southeastern Florida, which is already prone to frequent flooding ...

Rezone marine parks to better conserve sharks

A lack of habitat protection is hindering our ability to manage the conservation of endangered open-ocean sharks in Australian waters, according to new research by The University of Western Australia.

Atlantic haven is a test bed for planet's sickly oceans

Clad in diving gear or oilskins and gumboots, a team of scientists and activists spent weeks in the South Atlantic, enduring storms and choppy seas to check up on a place almost no-one has heard of.

Animals could help humans monitor oceans

Sharks, penguins, turtles and other seagoing species could help humans monitor the oceans by transmitting oceanographic information from electronic tags.

Warm ocean water delays sea ice for Alaska towns, wildlife

The U.S. research vessel Sikuliaq can break through ice as thick as 2.5 feet (0.76 meters). In the Chukchi Sea northwest of Alaska this month, which should be brimming with floes, its limits likely won't be tested.

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Seawater

Seawater is water from a sea or ocean. On average, seawater in the world's oceans has a salinity of about 3.5%. This means that every 1 kg of seawater has approximately 35 grams of dissolved salts (mostly, but not entirely, the ions of sodium chloride: Na+, Cl-). The average density of seawater at the surface of the ocean is 1.025 g/ml; seawater is denser than freshwater (which reaches a maximum density of 1.000 g/ml at a temperature of 4°C) because of the added mass of the salts. The freezing point of sea water decreases with increasing salinity and is about -2°C (28.4°F) at 35 gram per liter.

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