Salamanders chew with their palate

The Italian Crested Newt – Triturus carnifex – eats anything and everything it can overpower. Earthworms, mosquito larvae and water fleas are on its menu, but also snails, small fish and even its own offspring. A research ...

Environmental DNA helps protect great crested newts

Research by the University of Kent has revealed how tiny amounts of DNA (eDNA) released into water by great crested newts can be used to monitor the species. This can bring benefits for its conservation, and help protect ...

Scientists solved the Spallanzani's dilemma

Imagine losing an eye, an arm or even your spinal cord. When we are wounded, our bodies, and those of other mammals, generally respond by sealing the wound with scar tissue. The newt, however, has evolved unique strategies ...

Killer fungus invades Europe

n invasive pathogenic fungus (Batrachochytrium salamandrivorans) is a threat to European salamander and newt biodiversity. Bsal was originally discovered in the Netherlands because it caused mass mortality in salamanders ...

Emerging disease could wipe out American, European salamanders

A deadly disease that is wiping out salamanders in parts of Europe will inevitably reach the U.S. through the international wildlife trade unless steps are taken to halt its spread, says University of Maryland amphibian expert ...

European newts invade Australia

Once confined behind pet shop windows, the smooth newt (Lissotriton vulgaris) –a 'controlled pest animal' in Victoria – has made a new home in Melbourne's peri urban fringe.

Newts help chemist and radiologists to locate source of pain

(Phys.org) —The California newts on the Stanford campus may be limited in physical range to the area around a small now-dry lake, but their sphere of scientific influence extends much farther. Work that started in these ...

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