Putting a nanomachine to work

A team of chemists at LMU has successfully coupled the directed motion of a light-activated molecular motor to a different chemical unit—thus taking an important step toward the realization of synthetic nanomachines.

Rotation on an eight-shaped path

Chemical engineers at Ludwig-Maximilians-Universität (LMU) in Munich, Germany, have developed the first molecular motor that enables an eight-shaped movement.

Motor proteins and membrane dynamics

Membranes composed of a lipid bilayer define the outer surface of nucleated cells (the plasma membrane) and delimit the vital organelles within these cells, such as mitochondria and nuclei. The membrane curvature determines ...

Manipulating electron spin using artificial molecular motors

Artificial molecular switches and machines have undergone rapid advances over the past several decades. Particularly, artificial molecular motors are highly attractive from the viewpoint of chirality switching during rotational ...

Molecular motors run in unison in a metal-organic framework

For molecular motors to be exploited effectively, they need to be able to operate in unison. However, integrating billions of these nanometre-sized motors into a single system and getting them to operate in unison has proved ...

How bacteria mobility is like human locomotion

Do bacteria control their "walks" like we do? It might sound strange, but it's a fundamental question. Understanding bacteria motility would not only expand our understanding of their behavior, but would also contribute to ...

Molecular motors: Chemical carousel rotates in the cold

Molecular motors, which rotate unidirectionally in response to an external energy input, constitute an important class of components for future applications in the field of nanotechnology. Molecules whose structure and spatial ...

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