Male Trinidad guppies find food thanks to females

For male Trinidad Guppies applies: if you are hungry, seek female company. A recent study led by scientists of the the Leibniz-Institute of Freshwater Ecology and Inland Fisheries (IGB) and the Leibniz Institute for Zoo and ...

Cardinalfish caught sneaking a bit on the side

Scientists have revealed the torrid, adulterous love lives of the mouth-brooding cardinalfish, with cuckoldry going hand-in-hand with cannibalism of the young.

Male fish can thank genes for colourful looks

Striking traits seen only in males of some species – such as colourful peacock feathers or butterfly wings – are partly explained by gene behaviour, research suggests.

Being a dad is hard when you're a plainfin midshipman fish

Each spring, male plainfin midshipman fish (Porichthys notatus) —a kind of toadfish —emerge from the depths of the Pacific Ocean to breed on the beach. They overwhelm the beach at low tide, wedge themselves beneath ...

Fish fertilize eggs in their male relatives' nests

Male cichlid fish sometimes fertilize eggs in nests belonging to one of their male relatives, a behaviour that is counter-intuitive yet ultimately beneficial, according to a study published in BMC Biology.

Small-brained female guppies aren't drawn to attractive males

Female guppies with smaller brains can distinguish attractive males, but they don't recognise them as being more appealing or choose to mate with them, according to a new study by UCL and Stockholm University researchers.

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