An irresistible scent makes locusts swarm, study finds

The coronavirus isn't the only plague making headlines this year—locusts are devastating crops in several parts of the world, and now scientists are discovering why the pest forms destructive swarms.

Crunch, crunch: Africa's locust outbreak is far from over

The crunch of young locusts comes with nearly every step. The worst outbreak of the voracious insects in Kenya in 70 years is far from over, and their newest generation is now finding its wings for proper flight.

Q&A: Researchers investigate a plague of locusts in East Africa

A plague of locusts has descended on East Africa, devouring crops, trees, and pasture as they move. The first generation, which emerged at the end of last year, numbered in the hundreds of billions. Left unchecked, locusts ...

Famine risk for millions in second locust wave

A second wave of desert locusts in Africa and Asia is threatening famine for millions as critical resources are directed towards the COVID-19 crisis, scientists warn.

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Locust

Locusts are the swarming phase of short-horned grasshoppers of the family Acrididae. These are species that can breed rapidly under suitable conditions and subsequently become gregarious and migratory. They form bands as nymphs and swarms as adults—both of which can travel great distances, rapidly stripping fields and greatly damaging crops.

The origin and apparent extinction of certain species of locust – some of which reached 6 inches (150 mm) in length – are unclear.

Locusts are an edible insect and are considered a delicacy in some countries and throughout history.

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