Exploring the nanoworld in 3D

Imagine a cube on which light is projected by a flashlight. The cube reflects the light in a particular way, so simply spinning the cube or moving the flashlight makes it possible to examine each aspect and deduce information ...

How photoblueing disturbs microscopy

The latest developments in fluorescence microscopy make it possible to image individual molecules in cells or molecular complexes with a spatial resolution of up to 20 nanometres. However, under certain circumstances, an ...

Quantum leap: how we discovered a new way to create a hologram

Once, holograms were just a scientific curiosity. But thanks to the rapid development of lasers, they have gradually moved center stage, appearing on the security imagery for credit cards and bank notes, in science fiction ...

Spreading focus for better imaging

Extreme Ultraviolet (EUV) light in microscopy offers the advantage of obtaining a high-resolution image combined with spectral information about the object under study. However, because EUV microscopy uses diffraction instead ...

Comb of a lifetime: A new method for fluorescence microscopy

Fluorescence microscopy is widely used in biochemistry and life sciences because it allows scientists to directly observe cells and certain compounds in and around them. Fluorescent molecules absorb light within a specific ...

May the force be with you: Detecting ultrafast light by its force

A McGill research team has developed a new technique to detect nano-sized imperfections in materials. They believe this discovery will lead to improvements in the optical detectors used in a wide range of technologies, from ...

Researchers explore new depths in infrared nanospectroscopy

Researchers from the Nanooptics Group at CIC nanoGUNE (San Sebastian) demonstrate that nanoscale infrared imaging—which is established as a surface-sensitive technique—can be employed for chemical nanoidentification of ...

page 1 from 11