Related topics: google · facebook · lawmakers

Canada aims to beat 2030 climate target, says Trudeau

Canadian Prime Minister Justin Trudeau announced Friday an annual hike of his country's carbon tax by Can$15 (US$12) per tonne after 2022, and billions in new investments to try to beat its climate target.

Canada govt seeks carbon neutrality by 2050

The government of Canadian Prime Minister Justin Trudeau on Thursday submitted draft legislation that it said would allow the country to be carbon neutral by 2050, but his opponents dismissed the initiative as "smoke and ...

Simple actions can help people survive landslides

The March 2014 landslide in Oso, Washington, about 55 miles northeast of Seattle, became the deadliest landslide event in United States history. Forty-three people died and 49 homes and structures were destroyed.

The likely impact of Great American Outdoors Act

After winning final bipartisan approval in Congress last week, a bill that will pump billions of dollars into overdue repairs and maintenance of U.S. national parks is now headed to the president for his signature. It's an ...

U.S. Congress approves conservation bill

Congress has passed sweeping legislation allocating $900 million a year for the Land and Water Conservation Fund (LWCF), and an additional $9.5 billion over five years to address an urgent backlog of maintenance projects ...

page 1 from 19

Legislation

Legislation (or "statutory law") is law which has been promulgated (or "enacted") by a legislature or other governing body, or the process of making it. (Another source of law is judge-made law or case law.) Before an item of legislation becomes law it may be known as a bill, and may be broadly referred to as "legislation" while it remains under consideration to distinguish it from other business. Legislation can have many purposes: to regulate, to authorize, to proscribe, to provide (funds), to sanction, to grant, to declare or to restrict.

Under the Westminster system, an item of primary legislation is known as an Act of Parliament after enactment.

Legislation is usually proposed by a member of the legislature (e.g. a member of Congress or Parliament), or by the executive, whereupon it is debated by members of the legislature and is often amended before passage. Most large legislatures enact only a small fraction of the bills proposed in a given session. Whether a given bill will be proposed and enter into force is generally a matter of the legislative priorities of government.

Legislation is regarded as one of the three main functions of government, which are often distinguished under the doctrine of the separation of powers. Those who have the formal power to create legislation are known as legislators; a judicial branch of government will have the formal power to interpret legislation (see statutory interpretation); the executive branch of government can act only within the powers and limits set by the law.

This text uses material from Wikipedia, licensed under CC BY-SA