Helping tobacco plants save water

Research in the Electronic Plants group at the Laboratory of Organic Electronics, Campus Norrköping, follows two main avenues. In one, scientists incorporate electronic circuits into plants, such as roses, in a method of ...

Puzzling shapes: Unlocking the mysteries of plant cell morphology

The discovery of the mechanics and molecular mechanism that dictate cell shape formation in plants by a team of McGill researchers offers new clues about the fundamental processes governing tissue formation in multicellular ...

Bees required to create an excellent blueberry crop

Getting an excellent rabbiteye blueberry harvest requires helpful pollinators—particularly native southeastern blueberry bees—although growers can bring in managed honey bees to do the job, according to Agricultural Research ...

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Leaf

A leaf is an organ of a vascular plant, as defined in botanical terms, and in particular in plant morphology. Foliage is a mass noun that refers to leaves as a feature of plants.

Typically a leaf is a thin, flattened organ borne above ground and specialized for photosynthesis, but many types of leaves are adapted in ways almost unrecognisable in those terms: not flat (such as many succulent leaves and conifers), not above ground (such as bulb scales), or without photosynthetic function (consider for example cataphylls, spines, and cotyledons).

Conversely, many structures of non-vascular plants, or even of some lichens, do look and function much like leaves. Several structures found in vascular plants look like leaves but have different structures; examples include phyllodes and phylloclades.

This text uses material from Wikipedia, licensed under CC BY-SA