Understanding sea larvae is key to managing marine systems

An international study led by Monash University scientists has found that the distance traveled by marine larvae is dictated by both biological and physical constraints—contradicting previous hypotheses based on biology ...

The evolution of development

On the basis of an analysis of 520 million-year-old fossils, LMU researchers show that embryonic and larval development in the early ancestors of spiders and scorpions was strikingly and unexpectedly similar to that of modern ...

Equatorial fish babies in hot water

Scientists have discovered that rising ocean temperatures slow the development of baby fish around the equator, raising concerns about the impact of global warming on fish and fisheries in the tropics.

Stopping the worm from turning

Almost one in six people worldwide are infected by parasitic worms, while parasitic infections of livestock cause economic losses of billions of Euro per year. Resistance to the few drugs available to treat infections is ...

The time is right for cod research

Despite the ongoing crisis in cod farming, the Research Council of Norway is investing NOK 21 million into research on cod larvae. "Right move at the right time," believes Professor Ivar Rønnestad.

Ocean acidification linked to larval oyster failure

Researchers at Oregon State University have definitively linked an increase in ocean acidification to the collapse of oyster seed production at a commercial oyster hatchery in Oregon, where larval growth had declined to a ...

A worm bites off enough to chew (w/ Video)

Dramatic scenes are played out under Ralf Sommer's microscope: his research object, the roundworm Pristionchus pacificus, bites another worm, tears open a hole in its side and devours the oozing contents. The squirming victim ...

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