Using supercomputers to delve into the building blocks of matter

Nuclear physicists are known for their atom-smashing explorations of the building blocks of visible matter. At the Relativistic Heavy Ion Collider (RHIC), a particle collider at the U.S. Department of Energy's (DOE) Brookhaven ...

Physics boosts artificial intelligence methods

Researchers from Caltech and the University of Southern California (USC) report the first application of quantum computing to a physics problem. By employing quantum-compatible machine learning techniques, they developed ...

For one day only, LHC collides xenon beams

Today, the LHC is getting a taste of something unusual. For eight hours, the Large Hadron Collider is accelerating and colliding xenon nuclei, allowing the large LHC experiments, ATLAS, ALICE, CMS and LHCb, to record xenon ...

Electrons surfing on a laser beam

The Large Hadron Collider at CERN in Switzerland, the largest accelerator in the world, has a circumference of around 26 kilometres. Researchers at Friedrich-Alexander Universität Erlangen-Nürnberg (FAU), Germany, are attempting ...

ATLAS experiment studies fragments of the top quark

Top quarks in the Large Hadron Collider (LHC) proton-proton collisions are predominantly produced in pairs, with one top quark and one top antiquark. In order to measure the production rates of top quark pairs, the ATLAS ...

The superconducting magnets of the future

The superconducting magnets of the future are under development and CERN is on the front line. To increase the energy of circular colliders, physicists are counting on ever more powerful magnets, capable of generating magnetic ...

Particle physicists on a quest for 'new physics'

After five years of work, EPFL's physicists, together with some 800 international researchers involved in the CERN's LHCb project, have just taken an important step by building a new detector—a scintillating fiber tracker ...

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