Deposit insurance and depositor behavior: Evidence from Colombia

One of the feats that earned Douglas Diamond and Philip Dybvig the 2022 Nobel Prize in Economics (joint with Ben Bernanke) is a model of bank runs and related financial crises. In an article published in 1983, they noted ...

Climate risk insurance can effectively mitigate economic losses

Global warming is expected to lead to an accumulation of particularly intense hurricanes in the United States. This may substantially increase the economic losses caused by these storms. Better insurance could effectively ...

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Insurance

Insurance, in law and economics, is a form of risk management primarily used to hedge against the risk of a contingent loss. Insurance is defined as the equitable transfer of the risk of a loss, from one entity to another, in exchange for a premium, and can be thought of as a guaranteed small loss to prevent a large, possibly devastating loss. An insurer is a company selling the insurance; an insured or policyholder is the person or entity buying the insurance. The insurance rate is a factor used to determine the amount to be charged for a certain amount of insurance coverage, called the premium. Risk management, the practice of appraising and controlling risk, has evolved as a discrete field of study and practice.

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