Part-organic invention can be used in bendable mobile phones

Engineers at ANU have invented a semiconductor with organic and inorganic materials that can convert electricity into light very efficiently, and it is thin and flexible enough to help make devices such as mobile phones bendable.

The promise of deep grooves

A manufacturing technique that could help the semiconductor industry make more powerful computer chips began in the humblest of places—at a lunch table at the U.S. Department of Energy's (DOE) Argonne National Laboratory.

Scaling up biohybrid systems to synthesize fuels, chemicals

Bioelectrochemical systems combine the best of both worlds – microbial cells with inorganic materials – to make fuels and other energy-rich chemicals with unrivaled efficiency. Yet technical difficulties have kept them ...

NREL opens large database of inorganic thin-film materials

An extensive experimental database of inorganic thin-film materials that organizes a decade's worth of research at the Department of Energy's National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL) is now publicly available.

New material makes cooling devices more energy-efficient

Waste heat from industry can often not be utilised because of its low temperature. With this material, it can be used in environmentally friendly cooling systems for example in the field of building technology. The research ...

Scientists develop a new material for manipulating molecules

A scientist at the University of Córdoba, working with an international research team, has created a new porous single-crystal material that could have many applications in nanotechnology and catalysis.

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