New intracranial sensor serves to measure cerebral pressure

An increase in cerebral pressure may cause dementia and could destroy the brain. Companies have been seeking to find monitoring sensors that can be implanted into the brain, and read from outside the body. A tiny sensor may ...

Researchers provide answers to questions about relaxors

(Phys.org) -- University of Arkansas physicists and their colleagues have determined important information about the nanoscale properties of materials called relaxors, which can be used in electronic devices to change temperature ...

Graphene is thinnest known anti-corrosion coating

New research has established the "miracle material" called graphene as the world's thinnest known coating for protecting metals against corrosion. Their study on this potential new use of graphene appears in ACS Nano.

Protecting medical implants from attack

Millions of Americans have implantable medical devices, from pacemakers and defibrillators to brain stimulators and drug pumps; worldwide, 300,000 more people receive them every year. Most such devices have wireless connections, ...

Project uses smartphones to improve cochlear implants (w/ Video)

(PhysOrg.com) -- Many cochlear implant users may soon be able to easily modify the settings on their hearing devices using a smartphone interface, selecting one setting for a bustling restaurant, another for a hushed library.

page 6 from 7