Related topics: scaffold

An easily reversed hydrogel male contraceptive

A team of researchers working at China's Fourth Hospital of Harbin Medical University has developed a new kind of male contraceptive that is easily reversed. In their paper published in the journal ACS Nano, the group describes ...

A new solution for wastewater remediation

Synthetic dyes are used across a wide variety of industries and constitute a serious concern when it comes to water pollution. These dyes are not only toxic, but they also persist in the environment for a long time without ...

A versatile hydrogel network-repairing strategy

Hydrogen bond engineering can convey stretchability, toughness and self-healing properties to materials, although enhancement effects of conventional hydrogen bonds is limiting due to their weak interaction strength. For ...

A peptide hydrogel for efficient production of cell spheroids

Prof. Zhimou Yang, who has wored in the research field of peptide self-assembly biomaterials for more than 15 years, has designed a peptide hydrogel for cell spheroids production. "Supramolecular hydrogels of self-assembling ...

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Gel

A gel (from the lat. gelu—freezing, cold, ice or gelatus—frozen, immobile) is a solid, jelly-like material that can have properties ranging from soft and weak to hard and tough. Gels are defined as a substantially dilute cross-linked system, which exhibits no flow when in the steady-state. By weight, gels are mostly liquid, yet they behave like solids due to a three-dimensional cross-linked network within the liquid. It is the crosslinks within the fluid that give a gel its structure (hardness) and contribute to stickiness (tack). In this way gels are a dispersion of molecules of a liquid within a solid in which the solid is the continuous phase and the liquid is the discontinuous phase.

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