Using cellphone data to study the spread of cholera

While cholera has hardly changed over the past centuries, the tools used to study it have not ceased to evolve. Using mobile phone records of 150,000 users, an EPFL-led study has shown to what extent human mobility patterns ...

Behavioral studies from mobile crowd-sensing

Using mobile phones for research is not new. However, interpreting the data collected from volunteers' own smart phones—which has the potential to emulate randomised trials—can advance research into human behaviour. In ...

What 15 years of mobile data can say about us

Large-scale anonymised datasets from mobile phones can give a better picture of society than ever before available. Mobile phone use helps us understand social networks, mobility and human behaviour. A review article recently ...

The brains behind the chip that works like a brain

A company that started in Perth several years ago is poised to revolutionize the world-wide computer industry with a computer chip that aims to mimic the operations of the human brain.

Tomorrow's technology will lead to sweeping changes in society

Throughout history, whenever new technologies have emerged that change our means of production and ability to communicate they have tended to transform society. The rapid technological development of the past century – ...

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