Chromosomes look different than you think

In high school textbooks, human chromosomes are pictured as wonky Xs like two hotdogs jammed together. But those images are far from accurate. "For 90 percent of the time," said Jun-Han Su, "chromosomes don't exist like that."

Neandertals have adopted male sex chromosome from modern humans

In 1997, the very first Neandertal DNA sequence—just a small part of the mitochondrial genome—was determined from an individual discovered in the Neander Valley, Germany, in 1856. Since then, improvements in molecular ...

New protein complex gets chromosomes sorted

It is no secret that DNA, in the form of chromosomes, is the building block of life. Incorrect distribution of chromosomes during cell division can have disastrous consequences. Unbalanced chromosome copy, or aneuploidy, ...

Buttons and flies help biologists solve longtime DNA mystery

Biologists at Johns Hopkins University have uncovered an important clue in the longtime mystery of how long strands of DNA fold up to squeeze into microscopic cells, with each pair of chromosomes aligned to ensure perfect ...

Y chromosomes reveal population boom and bust in ancient Japan

Researchers at the University of Tokyo conducted a census of the Japanese population around 2,500 years ago using the Y chromosomes of men living on the main islands of modern-day Japan. This is the first time analysis of ...

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