Rapamycin changes the way our DNA is stored

Our genetic material is stored in our cells in a specific way to make the meter-long DNA molecule fit into the tiny cell nucleus of each body cell. An international team of researchers at the Max Planck Institute for Biology ...

Computer simulations animate in atomic detail how DNA opens

Researchers from the Hubrecht Institute in Utrecht (The Netherlands) and the Max Planck Institute for Molecular Biomedicine in Münster (Germany) used computer simulations to reveal in atomic detail how a short piece of DNA ...

New method to analyze nucleosomes

Northwestern Medicine scientists have developed a new method to analyze the protein composition of intact nucleosomes without losing combinatorial information present in chromatin. The technique, called Nuc-MS, could help ...

Protein can release trapped histones in the cell

In the cell nucleus, histones play a crucial role packaging DNA into chromatin. Histones are however very sticky to both DNA and RNA, so to ensure they are transported to the cell nucleus after synthesis and bind to the right ...

How epigenetic switches control gene expression

Scientists at Tokyo Institute of Technology have deciphered how to quantitatively assess the effects of specific epigenetic changes on the rate of transcription by developing a mathematical model. Using their method, they ...

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Histone

In biology, histones are highly alkaline proteins found in eukaryotic cell nuclei that package and order the DNA into structural units called nucleosomes. They are the chief protein components of chromatin, acting as spools around which DNA winds, and play a role in gene regulation. Without histones, the unwound DNA in chromosomes would be very long (a length to width ratio of more than 10 million to one in human DNA). For example, each human cell has about 1.8 meters of DNA, but wound on the histones it has about 90 micrometers (0.09 mm) of chromatin, which, when duplicated and condensed during mitosis, result in about 120 micrometers of chromosomes.

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