Study explores control options for black swallowwort

Black swallowwort is a difficult to control invasive vine that thrives in natural areas and perennial cropping systems across northeastern North America. To date, though, no scientific studies have been conducted to determine ...

Study shows hazardous herbicide chemical goes airborne

"Dicamba drift"—the movement of the herbicide dicamba off crops through the atmosphere—can result in unintentional damage to neighboring plants. To prevent dicamba drift, other chemicals, typically amines, are mixed with ...

Popular herbicide weakens bumblebees' color vision

Finnish researchers found out how Roundup, a herbicide containing glyphosate, affects the learning and memory of bumblebees. Already a small dose affected their ability to learn and memorize connections between colors and ...

Research shows path to long-term downy brome control

Downy brome is an invasive annual grass known to fuel devastating wildfires in the vast rangelands of western North America. Scientists say the weed represents a significant threat to native sagebrush ecosystems, and to ...

New herbicide solution inspired by cholesterol medicine

Curtin University researchers have discovered a promising new herbicide target site in plants with the potential to provide new solutions for growers dealing with the increasing problem of herbicide resistance.

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Herbicide

Herbicides, also commonly known as weedkillers, are pesticides used to kill unwanted plants. Selective herbicides kill specific targets while leaving the desired crop relatively unharmed. Some of these act by interfering with the growth of the weed and are often synthetic "imitations" of plant hormones. Herbicides used to clear waste ground, industrial sites, railways and railway embankments are non-selective and kill all plant material with which they come into contact. Smaller quantities are used in forestry, pasture systems, and management of areas set aside as wildlife habitat.

Some plants produce natural herbicides, such as the genus Juglans (walnuts), or the tree of heaven; such action of natural herbicides, and other related chemical interactions, is called allelopathy.

Herbicides are widely used in agriculture and in landscape turf management. In the U.S., they account for about 70% of all agricultural pesticide use.

This text uses material from Wikipedia, licensed under CC BY-SA