Related topics: hearing loss

Carnivorous plants: No escape for mosquitoes

Physically bound to a specific location, plants have to devise special ways to secure their supply of vital nutrients. Most plants have developed a root system to the nutrients they need in order to survive out of the soil. ...

All ears: Genetic bases of mammalian inner ear evolution

Mammals have adapted to live in the darkest of caves and the deepest oceans, and from the highest mountains to the plains. Along the way, mammals have also adapted a remarkable capacity in their sense of hearing, from the ...

Plant root hairs form outward due to shank hardening

A group of international researchers has discovered how plant root hair grows straight and long. Many studies of root hair growth have been performed, but the molecular mechanism for the suppression of growth on the sides ...

Connecting hearing helper molecules to the ear bone

Researchers at USC and Harvard have developed a new approach to repair cells deep inside the ear—a potential remedy that could restore hearing for millions of elderly people and others who suffer hearing loss.

Communication via calcium wave

Based on what we know today, the plant hormone auxin influences all aspects of plant growth and development. It makes corn thrive from germination to harvest, causes trees to grow skyward and date palms to produce sweet fruits. ...

Why roosters don't go deaf from their own loud crowing

A team of researchers with the University of Antwerp and the University of Ghent, both in Belgium, has uncovered the means by which roosters prevent themselves from going deaf due to their own loud crowing. In their paper ...

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Hair cell

Hair cells are the sensory receptors of both the auditory system and the vestibular system in all vertebrates. In mammals, the auditory hair cells are located within the organ of Corti on a thin basilar membrane in the cochlea of the inner ear. They derive their name from the tufts of stereocilia that protrude from the apical surface of the cell, a structure known as the hair bundle, into the scala media, a fluid-filled tube within the cochlea. Mammalian cochlear hair cells come in two anatomically and functionally distinct types: the outer and inner hair cells. Damage to these hair cells results in decreased hearing sensitivity, i.e. sensorineural hearing loss.

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