How was the Earth formed?

Just how did the Earth—our home and the place where life as we know it evolved—come to be created in the first place? In some fiery furnace atop a great mountain? On some divine forge with the hammer of the gods shaping ...

The Anthropocene: Hard evidence for a human-driven Earth

The evidence for a new geological epoch which marks the impact of human activity on the Earth is now overwhelming according to a recent paper by an international group of geoscientists. The Anthropocene, which is argued to ...

Physics determined ammonite shell shape

Ammonites are a group of extinct cephalopod mollusks with ribbed spiral shells. They are exceptionally diverse and well known to fossil lovers. Régis Chirat, researcher at the Laboratoire de Géologie de Lyon: Terre, Planètes ...

New mystery on Mars' forgotten plains

(PhysOrg.com) -- One of the supposedly best understood and least interesting landscapes on Mars is hiding something that could rewrite the planet's history. Or not. In fact, about all that is certain is that decades of assumptions ...

Earthquakes actually aftershocks of 19th century quakes

(PhysOrg.com) -- When small earthquakes shake the central U.S., citizens often fear the rumbles are signs a big earthquake is coming. Fortunately, new research instead shows that most of these earthquakes are aftershocks ...

'Tiny clocks' crystallize understanding of meteorite crashes

Almost two billion years ago, a 10-kilometre-wide chunk of space slammed down into rock near what is now the city of Sudbury. Now, scientists from Western University and the University of Portsmouth are marrying details of ...

Scientists home in on a potential Anthropocene 'golden spike'

The international working group, which includes geologists Jan Zalasiewicz, Mark Williams and Colin Waters, from the University of Leicester's School of Geography, Geology and the Environment and archaeologist Matt Edgeworth ...

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