Related topics: species

Scientists examine the ethnobotanical uses of stramonium

The Datura genus, which includes stramonium, encompasses a number of plant species that have featured heavily in the traditional medicine and popular culture of countries such as Mexico and Spain.

Thirteen new ant species discovered in Hong Kong

In two separate articles recently published in Zookeys and Asian Myrmecology, Dr. Benoit Guénard from the School of Biological Sciences of the University of Hong Kong (HKU) and his team has expanded the knowledge on Hong ...

Diversification after mass extinction

A team led by LMU paleontologist Adriana López-Arbarello has identified three hitherto unknown fossil fish species in the Swiss Alps, which provide new insights into the diversification of the genus Eosemionotus.

A new species of huntsman spider described

Senckenberg scientist Dr. Peter Jäger has described four new species in the huntsman spider family. One of the newly discovered animals reveals a surprising specialization: It makes its home inside of bamboo. To enter the ...

Sloths are far more adaptable than we realised

Unless you live in the tropical rainforests of South or Central America, most of the sloths you'll encounter will be two-toed sloths. This is because they are able to eat quite a varied diet and are therefore relatively easy ...

page 1 from 20

Genus

In biology, a genus (plural: genera) is a low-level taxonomic rank used in the biological classification of living and fossil organisms, which is an example of definition by genus and differentia. Genera and higher taxonomic levels such as families are used in biodiversity studies, particularly in fossil studies since species cannot always be confidently identified and genera and families typically have longer stratigraphic ranges than species.

The term comes from Latin genus "descent, family, type, gender", cognate with Greek: γένος – genos, "race, stock, kin".

The composition of a genus is determined by a taxonomist. The standards for genus classification are not strictly codified, and hence different authorities often produce different classifications for genera. In the hierarchy of the binomial classification system, genus comes above species and below family.

This text uses material from Wikipedia, licensed under CC BY-SA