Related topics: genes · genetic variation · genome

Genome editing strategy could improve rice, other crops

Scientists at UC Davis have used CRISPR technology to genetically engineer rice with high levels of beta-carotene, the precursor of vitamin A. The technique they used provides a promising strategy for genetically improving ...

Family matters for world's second biggest fish

The world's second biggest fish—the basking shark—prefers to travel with family to familiar feeding sites, according to a new study led by the University of Aberdeen.

Simplifying simple sequence repeats

Simple sequence repeats (SSRs) are regions of DNA with high diversity, and they have long been a mainstay for botanists examining the genetic structure of plant populations. However, as the cost of sequencing DNA continues ...

Scientists devise 'lifespan clock'

An Australian research team say they have come up with a "lifespan clock" which provides accurate maximum age estimates for vertebrates, a key variable in the study of both living and extinct animals.

Advanced breeding paves the way for disease-resistant beans

ETH researchers are involved in the development and implementation of a method to efficiently breed for disease-resistant beans in different regions of the world. Their work will help to improve the livelihood and food security ...

Coral host responses to heat and sediment stress

NUS marine ecologists have discovered changes in the gene expression of corals subjected to short-term heat and sediment stress which provide critical insights for more effective reef management strategies.

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Genetic marker

A genetic marker is a gene or DNA sequence with a known location on a chromosome and associated with a particular gene or trait. It can be described as a variation, which may arise due to mutation or alteration in the genomic loci, that can be observed. A genetic marker may be a short DNA sequence, such as a sequence surrounding a single base-pair change (single nucleotide polymorphism, SNP), or a long one, like minisatellites.

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