Related topics: genes · genetic variation · genome

Advanced breeding paves the way for disease-resistant beans

ETH researchers are involved in the development and implementation of a method to efficiently breed for disease-resistant beans in different regions of the world. Their work will help to improve the livelihood and food security ...

Coral host responses to heat and sediment stress

NUS marine ecologists have discovered changes in the gene expression of corals subjected to short-term heat and sediment stress which provide critical insights for more effective reef management strategies.

Record-breaking DNA comparisons drive fast forensics

Forensic investigators arrive at the scene of a crime to search for clues. There are no known suspects, and every second that passes means more time for the trail to run cold. A DNA sample is discovered, collected, and then ...

Software to protect the world's most endangered species

By combining genetic and environmental databases, researchers at EPFL are seeking to help biologists identify more accurately the animal and plant species most exposed to climate change, in order to develop appropriate conservation ...

Switchgrass hybrid yields insights into plant evolution

Switchgrass is attractive as a potential bioenergy crop because it can grow for years without having to be replanted. Requiring less fertilizer than typical annual crops like corn, switchgrass can keep more nitrogen, phosphorus ...

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Genetic marker

A genetic marker is a gene or DNA sequence with a known location on a chromosome and associated with a particular gene or trait. It can be described as a variation, which may arise due to mutation or alteration in the genomic loci, that can be observed. A genetic marker may be a short DNA sequence, such as a sequence surrounding a single base-pair change (single nucleotide polymorphism, SNP), or a long one, like minisatellites.

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