Study finds rising ozone a hidden threat to corn

Like atmospheric methane and carbon dioxide, ground-level ozone is on the rise. But ozone, a noxious chemical byproduct of fossil fuel combustion, has received relatively little attention as a potential threat to corn agriculture.

Genome study reveals extent, diversity of Roman-era pandemic

New research on one of history's most devastating plagues shows that it spread farther than previously believed, reaching post–Roman Britain, and provides new information about the plague bacteria's evolution during a pandemic ...

Cardinalfish caught sneaking a bit on the side

Scientists have revealed the torrid, adulterous love lives of the mouth-brooding cardinalfish, with cuckoldry going hand-in-hand with cannibalism of the young.

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Genetic analysis

Genetic analysis can be used generally to describe methods both used in and resulting from the sciences of genetics and molecular biology, or to applications resulting from this research.

Genetic analysis may be done to identify genetic/inherited disorders and also to make a differential diagnosis in certain somatic diseases such as cancer. Genetic analyses of cancer include detection of mutations, fusion genes, and DNA copy number changes.

Genetic analyses include molecular technologies such as PCR, RT-PCR, DNA sequencing, and DNA microarrays, and cytogenetic methods such as karyotyping and fluoresence in situ hybridisation.

Please note: This field is fast-changing, definitions are in flux, there is historical and contemporary overlap of the following categories, and phrases like "the results of genetic analysis" can indicate any or all of the following, depending on the facts of the matter being described.

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