Turkey frees 7,500 illegally hunted frogs into river

Turkish gendarmerie have released 7,500 illegally hunted frogs—which had been destined for dining tables in China and France—into safe waters, after uncovering a poaching ring.

Atrazine alters the sex ratio in Blanchard's cricket frogs

A study published recently in Environmental Toxicology and Chemistry found that Blanchard's cricket frogs are highly sensitive to atrazine. When exposed, there were up to 55% fewer males than females compared with the control ...

An engineer's guide to the embryo

In roughly 48 hours, the single cell of the fertilized frog egg will undergo dramatic change to develop vital body parts like muscles, a skeleton, eyes, a heart, and a tadpole tail. Scientists have been studying this process ...

Why poison frogs don't poison themselves

Don't let their appearance fool you: Thimble-sized, dappled in cheerful colors and squishy, poison frogs in fact harbor some of the most potent neurotoxins we know. With a new paper published in the journal Science, scientists ...

Tiny Brazilian frogs are deaf to their own calls

Pumpkin toadlets, found on the leaf litter of Brazil's Atlantic forest, are among the smallest frogs in the world. An international team from Brazil, Denmark and the United Kingdom, has discovered that two species of these ...

Bite force research reveals dinosaur-eating frog

Scientists say that a large, now extinct, frog called Beelzebufo that lived about 68 million years ago in Madagascar would have been capable of eating small dinosaurs.

Foster tadpoles trigger parental instinct in poison frogs

Poison frogs, especially male poison frogs, are very caring parents. After the tadpoles hatch, the males piggyback their offspring to distant pools spread around the rainforest where they can feed and develop. In a recent ...

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