Predicting human evolution: Teeth tell the story

Monash University-led research has shown that the evolution of human teeth is much simpler than previously thought, and that we can predict the sizes of teeth missing from human fossils and those of our extinct close relatives ...

Tiny teeth are new mouse species, a rare 'living fossil'

(PhysOrg.com) -- Tiny fossil teeth discovered in Inner Mongolia are a new species of birch mouse, indicating that ancestors of the small rodent are much older than previously reported, according to paleontologist Yuri Kimura, ...

Diet likely changed game for some hominids 3.5 million years ago

A new look at the diets of ancient African hominids shows a "game changer" occurred about 3.5 million years ago when some members added grasses or sedges to their menus, according to a new study led by the University of Colorado ...

The evolution of the baleen in whales

Baleen whales, such as the gigantic 30m-long blue whale, are the largest animals that have ever lived on this planet. They even beat the largest of the dinosaurs. But, ironically, the secret to their success lies in their ...

First fossil bird with teeth specialized for tough diet

Beak shape variation in Darwin's finches is a classic example of evolutionary adaptation, with beaks that vary widely in proportions and shape, reflecting a diversity of ecologies. While living birds have a beak to manipulate ...

Odd Mosaic of Dental Features Reveals Undocumented Primate

(PhysOrg.com) -- It's in the teeth. An odd mosaic of dental features recently unearthed in northern Egypt reveals a previously undocumented, highly-specialized primate called Nosmips aenigmaticus that lived in Africa nearly ...

Scientists study hands of fearsome, meat-eating dinosaur

(PhysOrg.com) -- 66 million years ago, the fearsome, meat-eating dinosaur Majungasaurus crenatissimus prowled the semi-arid lowlands of Madagascar. Its powerful jaws bristled with bladelike teeth, and its strong legs terminated ...

Researchers uncover 'oldest' dog remains in Swiss cave

Researchers have found that fragments of a dog's skull and teeth discovered in a cave in Switzerland date back more than 14,000 years in what could be the oldest known remains of man's best friend.

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