String of firsts in forensic proteomics for ricin detection

As the first author of her first publication, Isabelle O'Bryon developed the first forensic proteomics method to more quickly detect ricin, a lethal toxin that is often crudely made in home laboratories. With this method, ...

Bringing burnt bones back to life using 3-D technology

Forensic scientists at the University of Portsmouth have discovered a new way of presenting fragile evidence, by reconstructing a 'jigsaw' of human bone fragments using 3-D printing.

New algorithm examines crime-scene bullets segment by segment

On the morning of March 22, 1915, residents of the small town of West Shelby, New York, awoke to a horrific scene. A woman clad only in a bloodied nightgown lay shot to death in the snow on the doorstep of an immigrant farmhand, ...

Fingerprints, revisited

For more than a century, forensic scientists have linked criminals to crime scenes through the distinctive loops and whorls on their fingertips. But now, researchers are moving beyond simple pattern comparisons to glean more ...

Research shows hidden fire risk of emollients

New research carried out by forensic scientists at Anglia Ruskin University has shown that commonly-used emollients can pose a significant fire risk once they have dried on fabric such as clothing and bedding.

Rehydration: Mexican forensic scientists' crime-fighting weapon

Jorge's putrefied corpse would have been buried in an unmarked grave but for a rehydration technique pioneered in Mexico that allowed him to be identified by his tattoos and given the send-off his family wanted.

Prominent academics call for more science in forensic science

With forensic science facing mounting scrutiny as it plays an increasingly prominent role in the administration of justice, six scientists who recently served on the National Commission on Forensic Science are calling on ...

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