Verifying forecasts for major stratospheric sudden warmings

A stratospheric sudden warming is perhaps one of the most radical changes of weather that is observed on our planet. As numerical weather prediction models have improved, including better representation of the stratosphere, ...

The current winter is a big win for seasonal forecasts

Seasonal forecasts for this winter were markedly accurate, with mild conditions in Northern Europe in December and January predicted already in October. Researchers in the S2S4E project are now working to find out how to ...

Record heat forecast for coming years

The coming five years are anticipated to be warmest period on record, Britain's Met Office said Thursday, warning of an outside chance of Earth breaching the Paris deal 1.5C temperature rise cap before 2024.

Aeolus winds now in daily weather forecasts

ESA's Aeolus satellite has been returning profiles of Earth's winds since 3 September 2018, just after it was launched—and after months of careful testing these measurements are considered so good that the European Centre ...

Experiment closes critical gap in weather forecasting

Scientists working on the next frontier of weather forecasting are hoping that weather conditions 3-to-4 weeks out will soon be as readily available as seven-day forecasts. Having this type of weather information—called ...

NASA soil data joins the Air Force

Getting stuck on a muddy road is a hassle for anyone, but for the U.S. Army it could be far more serious—a matter of life and death in some parts of the world. That's one of the reasons the U.S. Air Force HQ 557th Weather ...

page 1 from 23

Forecastle

Forecastle refers to the upper deck of a sailing ship forward of the foremast, or the forward part of a ship with the sailors' living quarters. Related to the latter meaning is the phrase "before the mast" which denotes anything related to ordinary sailors, as opposed to a ship's officers.

In medieval shipbuilding, a ship of war was usually equipped with a tall, multi-deck castle-like structure in the bow of the ship. It served as a platform for archers to shoot down on enemy ships, or as a defensive stronghold if the ship were boarded. A similar but usually much larger structure, called the aftcastle, was at the aft end of the ship, often stretching all the way from the main mast to the stern.

Having such tall upper works on the ship was detrimental to sailing performance. As cannons were introduced and gunfire replaced boarding as the primary means of naval combat during the 16th century, the medieval forecastle was no longer needed, and later ships such as the galleon had only a low, one-deck high forecastle.

In addition to crew's quarters, the forecastle may contain essential machinery such as the anchor windlass. On many modern US Naval ships, such as aircraft carriers, the forecastle is the location where boatswain will display their fancy knotwork such as coxcombing.

Some sailing ships and many modern non-sail ships have no forecastle as such at all but the name is still used to indicate the foremost part of the upper deck – although often called the foredeck – and for any crews quarters in the bow of the ship, even if below the main deck.

This text uses material from Wikipedia, licensed under CC BY-SA