How grasses avoid inbreeding

Corn, rice, wheat, sugar cane—the grass family contains a number of species that are important food sources for humans and have been bred and cultivated for millennia. Wild and farm animals, too, depend heavily on grasses ...

The long and short of a supergene for efficient pollination

Scientists have solved the century-old mystery of a supergene that causes efficient cross-pollination in flowers. The results show that sequence length variation at the DNA level is important for the evolution of two forms ...

Plants quick to let their flowers fade for protection

Microbes growing on flowers have adverse effects on their yields. This is why plants are quick to shed their flowers, reveals a new study involving both field experiments and plant microbiome analysis.

Plant buddies now at odds over declining pollinators

Competition for pollinating insects may reduce the ability of plant species to coexist, according to a paper published in Nature. This effect, which may impact plant diversity, is expected to be heightened as the number of ...

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Flowering plant

Amborellaceae Nymphaeales Austrobaileyales Mesangiospermae

Anthophyta Magnoliophyta Cronquist, Takht. & W.Zimm., 1966

The flowering plants or angiosperms (Angiospermae or Magnoliophyta) are the most diverse group of land plants. The flowering plants and the gymnosperms are the only extant groups of seed plants. The flowering plants are distinguished from other seed plants by a series of apomorphies, or derived characteristics.

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