How marine algae could help feed the world

Our planet faces a growing food crisis. According to the United Nations, more than 800 million people are regularly undernourished. By 2050, an additional 2 to 3 billion new guests will join the planetary dinner table.

Stiff fibres spun from slime

Nature is an excellent teacher – even for material scientists. Researchers, including scientists at the Max Planck Institute of Colloids and Interfaces, have now observed a remarkable mechanism by which polymer materials ...

New insights into the fuctions of fat metabolism

What happens when the body's fat stores are activated? With the support of the Austrian Science Fund FWF, the biochemist Ruth Birner-Grünberger investigated the complex interaction of activation and regulation in fat breakdown, ...

Biochemists link synthetic compound to hunger-hormone production

New research suggests that a man-made cousin of a small molecule found in olive oil can disrupt the hunger-signaling pathway. Researchers identified this promising new target by screening a library of roughly 1,600 small ...

Lipid transfer from plants to arbuscular mycorrhiza fungi

Textbooks tell us that in arbuscular mycorrhizal symbioses, the host plant supplies its fungal symbionts solely with sugars, in return for inorganic nutrients. New findings by Ludwig-Maximilians-Universitaet (LMU) researchers ...

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