Tubers in trouble

Extinction by its very nature is irreversible. Once a species is extinct, it's too late for conservation practitioners to act. So, for us working on the front line of plant conservation, instead of just questioning whether ...

When it comes to the threat of extinction, size matters

Animals in the Goldilocks zone—neither too big, nor too small, but just the right size—face a lower risk of extinction than do those on both ends of the scale, according to an extensive global analysis.

Study sheds new light on extinction risk in mammals

Researchers have long assumed that habitat fragmentation contributes to extinction risk for animals, but until now, they have not been able to measure it for a major group of animals on a global scale. In a first-of-its-kind ...

When estimating extinction risk, don't leave out the males

Extinction risk for some species could be drastically underestimated because most demographic models of animal populations only analyse the number and fertility of females, dismissing male data as 'noise'.

'Black swan' events strike animal populations

Black swan events are rare and surprising occurrences that happen without notice and often wreak havoc on society. The metaphor has been used to describe banking collapses, devastating earthquakes and other major surprises ...

On land and at sea, large animals are in 'double jeopardy'

Large animals hunted for their parts—such as elephant ivory and shark fins—are in double jeopardy of extinction due to their large body size and high value, according to a new analysis reported in the Cell Press journal ...

Why vultures matter—and what we lose if they're gone

Vultures. Cartoon characters in parched deserts often wish them to disappear, since circling vultures are a stereotypical harbinger of death. But, joking aside, vultures in some parts of the world are in danger of disappearing. ...

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