Related topics: archaeologists

Student-led dinosaur excavation culminates in airlift

The process of unearthing a dinosaur skeleton from the ground, bit by bit, is complicated yet incredibly rewarding. The ups and downs of the excavation process is something Annie McIntosh and Mark Powers know all about—the ...

Search for clues may explain collapse of ancient city in Mexico

Built more than a thousand years before the Aztec arrived in central Mexico, Teotihuacan was once one of the largest cities in the world. Its stone temples, comparable in size to Egypt's pyramids, still draw fascinated visitors, ...

Mexico ups protection at pre-Hispanic ceremonial site

Mexico has declared a pre-Hispanic site in the central state of Guanajuato as an archaeological monument zone protecting it from the possibility of encroaching development and expressing a commitment to continue excavating ...

Cutting edge science reveals Gribshunden's shipwrecked secrets

New excavations have coaxed more secrets from Gribshunden, the flagship of the Danish-Norwegian King Hans which mysteriously sank in 1495 off the coast of Ronneby, Sweden. The wreck is internationally significant as the world's ...

'Hascherkeller' reveals its secrets

In the debate about the social structure of the Central European Early Iron Age, the "Herrenhof" plays a considerable role as the presumed seat of a high-status farmer. A rectangular farmstead of this type is the famous "Hascherkeller" ...

Human bones used for making pendants in the Stone Age

In the Stone Age, pendants with potent symbolism were made from animal teeth and bones, adorning clothes or accessories and serving as rattles. Human bones were also used as a raw material for pendants, as demonstrated by ...

Tortoise and her egg found in new Pompeii excavations

Archaeologists in Pompeii have discovered the remains of a pregnant tortoise that had sought refuge in the ruins of a home destroyed by an earthquake in 62 AD, only to be covered by volcanic ash and rock when Mount Vesuvius ...

Olive trees were first domesticated 7,000 years ago

A joint study by researchers from Tel Aviv University and the Hebrew University unraveled the earliest evidence for domestication of a fruit tree. The researchers analyzed remnants of charcoal from the Chalcolithic site of ...

Early urbanism found in the Amazon

More than 20 years ago, Dr. Heiko PrĂ¼mers from the German Archaeological Institute and Prof. Dr. Carla Jaimes Betancourt from the University of Bonn, at that time a student in La Paz, began archaeological excavations on ...

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