Probing quantum physics on a macroscopic scale

Why does quantum mechanics work so well for microscopic objects, yet macroscopic objects are described by classical physics? This question has bothered physicists since the development of quantum theory more than 100 years ...

Griffith precision measurement takes it to the limit

Griffith University researchers have demonstrated a procedure for making precise measurements of speed, acceleration, material properties and even gravity waves possible, approaching the ultimate sensitivity allowed by laws ...

New method could lead to more powerful quantum sensors

As quantum technology continues to come into its own, investment is happening on a global scale. Soon, we could see improvements in machine learning models, financial risk assessment, efficiency of chemical catalysts and ...

Space-borne quantum source to secure communication

Soon, powerful quantum computers will be able to easily crack conventional mathematically encrypted codes. Entangled photons generated by a spaceborne quantum source could enable hack-proof key exchange for ultra high security ...

Physicists race to demystify Einstein's 'spooky' science

When it comes to fundamental physics, things can get spooky. At least that's what Albert Einstein said when describing the phenomenon of quantum entanglement—the linkage of particles in such a way that measurements performed ...

Light from ancient quasars helps confirm quantum entanglement

Last year, physicists at MIT, the University of Vienna, and elsewhere provided strong support for quantum entanglement, the seemingly far-out idea that two particles, no matter how distant from each other in space and time, ...

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